Standard: API - 4213

FATE OF OIL IN A WATER ENVIRONMENT PHASE II A DYNAMIC MODEL OF THE MASS BALANCE FOR RELEASED OIL

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Scope:

INTRODUCTION

A review and evaluation of the literature concerning the fate of oil in a water environment showed that previous research efforts entailed a wide variety of studies involving numerous complex interactions. This report concluded that a substantial amount of integration would be required in order to understand this difficult problem to the extent that future research efforts related to mass balance relationships could be guided by utilizing the existing knowledge (Kolpack, et. al., 1973).

The complexity of the problem indicated that an objective assessment of the interactions involved would require the aid of a computer model. This conclusion was reached, in part, because previous models involving this topic (for example, Garrett, 1972; Berridge, et. al., 1968; Blumer, et. al., 1970; Pilpel, 1968; and Zobell, 1963)were limited by the ability of the human brain to quantitatively treat the immense volume of facts, events, and time dependent modifications involved in fate of oil studies. For example, the Garrett model (Fig. 1-1) shows only the processes operating on a surface slick. On the other hand, computer models permit the human element to augment its capabilities by utilizing a broad range of reference values.

In some cases it is worthwhile to simulate a problem in order to gain useful information because the problem may be so complex that representing it by a mathematical model is not a prudent approach. Simulation usually concentrates on generating highly specific results from highly specific assumptions. In other words, it is a technique for studying problems that are otherwise mathematically intractable. The technique allows one to describe a particular situation, rather than to find a general solution, and can be used on any problem that can be stated quantitatively. The fate of oil in the marine environment problem is amenable to this approach.

Organization: American Petroleum Institute
Document Number: 4213
Publish Date: 1977-03-01
Page Count: 524
Available Languages: EN
DOD Adopted: NO
ANSI Approved: NO
Most Recent Revision: YES
Current Version: YES
Status: Inactive
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