Standard: WRC BUL 183

CRITICAL LITERATURE REVIEW OF EMBRITTLEMENT IN 2 ¼ CR-1 MO STEEL

This standard is available for individual purchase.

or unlock this standard with a subscription to IHS Standards Expert

IHS Standards Expert subscription, simplifies and expedites the process for finding and managing standards by giving you access to standards from over 370 standards developing organizations (SDOs).

FEATURES & BENEFITS
  • Maximize product development and R&D with direct access to over 1.6 million standards
  • Discover new markets: Identify unmet needs and discover next-generation technologies
  • Improve quality by leveraging consistent standards to meet customer and market requirements
  • Minimize risk: Mitigate liability and better understand compliance regulations
  • Boost efficiency: Speed up research, capture and reuse expertise
For additional product information, visit the IHS Standards Expert page.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
For more information or a custom quote, visit the IHS Contact Us page for regional contact information.
Scope:

Current trends in the design of large pressure vessels require massive sections that operate under high stresses and at high temperatures. To attain good through-section fracture toughness values at the higher yield strength required for such components, steels with higher hardenabiiity, and thus greater heat treatment potential, are used. However. during the fabrication process or later during the vessel's actual service, certain of these steels exhibit microcracking and/or severe embrittlement. Research efforts with the steels have resulted in the identification and characterization of some of these problems. In particular, temper embrittlement, creep embrittlement and stress-relief cracking have been shown to be causes of cracking and low toughness. Each of these forms of embrittlement or cracking results in a distinct behavior of the steel: steels susceptible to temper embrittiement when operated for long times in the temperature range 650-1050F may severely embrittle, causing the temperature at which the material undergoes the ductile to brittle transition to increase several hundred degrees. Steels susceptible to creep embrittlement, when operated under load for long times in the temperature range 800-1100F, may exhibit a severe reduction in the stress-rupture ductility of the material. Steels susceptible to stress-relief cracking may exhibit cracks which appear to start at the outside surface of a weld at the fusion boundary. These cracks occur with heating in the temperature range 200-1800F, depending on the alloy considered

Organization: Welding Research Council
Document Number: wrc bul 183
Publish Date: 1973-05-01
Page Count: 25
Change Type: NEW ADDITION
Available Languages: EN
DOD Adopted: NO
ANSI Approved: NO
Most Recent Revision: YES
Current Version: YES
Status: Active
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement