Standard: AA GSR

GUIDELINES FOR ALUMINUM SCRAP RECEIVING AND INSPECTION BASED ON SAFETY AND HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS

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Scope:

Solid bulk aluminum is a very safe noncombustible metal, but molten aluminum and aluminum powder can be highly reactive - capable of releasing large amounts of energy in chemical reactions. Water, nitrates and other oxidizers can cause devastating explosions if charged into a furnace that already holds molten aluminum.

Various heavily oxidized metals can combine with molten aluminum in a potentially serious thermite reaction; flammable materials can catch fire. Radioactive materials, PCBs and certain other toxic substances can endanger the health of both scrapyard and remelting plant workers. Aluminum "fines" - granulated or powdered aluminum - can explode if mixed with air in the presence of an ignition source. Even live ammunition has been discovered in aluminum scrap!

General safety practices are discussed in the Aluminum Association's Guidelines for Handling Molten Aluminum, Third Edition, but hazards of the sort described above must be prevented before aluminum scrap reaches the remelting furnace.

Consequently, the following guidelines deal with practices intended to keep water and other contaminants out of aluminum scrap destined for remelting; to discover water and contaminants in incoming aluminum scrap; to remove water and contaminants from incoming scrap when possible; and to reject and report unacceptably contaminated scrap.

Organization: The Aluminum Association Inc.
Document Number: aa gsr
Publish Date: 2002-01-01
Page Count: 37
Available Languages: EN
DOD Adopted: NO
ANSI Approved: NO
Most Recent Revision: YES
Current Version: YES
Status: Active

Document History

Document # Change Type Update Date Revision Status
AA GSR Change Type: Update Date: 1992-01-01 Revision: 92 Status: INAC

This Standard References

Showing 3 of 3.

AA PUBL T-4
AA PUBL GMA

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