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IEEE P1541 DRAFT

Prefixes for Binary Multiples

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Organization: IEEE
Publication Date: 1 May 2018
Status: active
Page Count: 14
scope:

This standard defines prefixes and letter symbols that denote multiplication of a unit by the binary multiplier 1024 (equal to 2^10) and integral powers thereof. The prefixes and letter symbols are for use with all units and their symbols, in all fields where multiplication by a binary multiplier is found to be appropriate.

Purpose

The prefixes kilo, mega, giga, etc., are defined by the SI Brochure, "International System of Units," and other international standards to stand solely for powers of 10. Using them to stand for binary multiples, such as powers of 1024, is internationally deprecated. Alternative but conveniently similar prefixes standing for multiples of 1024 are provided by the ISO/IEC 80000 standard series, "Quantities and Units," and by NIST, with which this standard is consistent.

Document History

IEEE P1541 DRAFT
May 1, 2018
Prefixes for Binary Multiples
This standard defines prefixes and letter symbols that denote multiplication of a unit by the binary multiplier 1024 (equal to 2^10) and integral powers thereof. The prefixes and letter symbols are...
December 11, 2002
Trial-Use Standard for Prefixes for Binary Multiples
Foreword Modern computers use binary logic for computation and addressing, and binary logic inevitably leads to addresses expressed in binary arithmetic. The size of such an address space is...
December 11, 2002
Trial-Use Standard for Prefixes for Binary Multiples
Foreword Modern computers use binary logic for computation and addressing, and binary logic inevitably leads to addresses expressed in binary arithmetic. The size of such an address space is...

References

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