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NPFC - MIL-STD-1625

SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS

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Organization: NPFC
Publication Date: 27 August 2009
Status: active
Page Count: 147
scope:

Scope of the safety certification program (SCP). The scope of the SCP is as follows:

Purpose. The purpose of the SCP is to ensure the safety of U.S. Navy ships during docking and undocking operations, while in dock, while under construction, and during launching and transfer operations. The designed capacity of the drydocking facility is to be determined, as well as its current material condition with regard to its foundations, structure, and supporting auxiliary systems, including those for ship protection. Also included is an assessment of operating procedures, manning and personnel qualification procedures, and maintenance procedures supporting operational reliability.

Limitations of SCP scope. There are many applicable federal and state laws, as well as ordinances and regulations; compliance in these areas may be under the cognizance of other Government agencies. The scope of the SCP excludes the following:

a. Personnel safety. Requirements of agencies, such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Radiological controls are to be implemented using separate programmatic requirements.

b. Mechanical handling system. Safety requirements in the design and operation of equipment such as cranes.

c. Service systems. Facility subsystems that are installed solely to provide habitability and housekeeping services to the ship, such as potable water and steam for heating and galley. The facility subsystems, such as raw and salt water and compressed air, are included in the scope of the SCP to the extent that they support ship protection systems.

d. Industrial systems. Systems used in industrial services, such as welding or abrasive blasting.

e. Labor and environment. All labor and environmental issues, such as those required by the Department of Labor and the Environmental Protection Agency, including hazardous material issues and pollution control systems.

Facilities included in SCP. Floating dry docks, graving docks, marine railways, vertical lifts, launch ways, and transfer ways are included in the SCP.

Non-permanent facilities or facilities of unusual design. Non-permanent facilities or facilities of unusual design used for performing functions similar to those of the facilities referenced in 1.2 are also covered by the SCP. The process leading to certification of non-permanent facilities or unusual facilities will normally be conducted more expeditiously and economically by submission and review of a preliminary facility certification report (FCR), as indicated in 4.3.2.

Facilities located abroad. Facilities located outside the U.S. are included in the SCP only if they are operated by the U.S. Navy.

Facilities for nuclear-powered ships. This document applies to the drydocking of all U.S. Navy ships. Additional requirements that apply solely to drydocking nuclear-powered ships will be invoked by the Navy to supplement these requirements.

Applicability of the SCP. The SCP is applicable to evolutions involving U.S. Navy ships as defined by the Naval Vessel Register (http://www.nvr.navy.mil) under the status categories of Active, Under Construction, and Naval Reserve Force, Active, and is also applicable to Military Sealift Command (MSC) ships under construction. This standard may be invoked for other ships, service craft, and small boats on a case basis when it is determined to be in the best interest of the Navy.

intended Use:

The criteria covered in this standard are intended to determine the suitability of a facility for docking, launching, or transferring U.S. Navy ships. The criteria is military unique in that there... View More

Document History

MIL-STD-1625
August 27, 2009
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
Scope of the safety certification program (SCP). The scope of the SCP is as follows: Purpose. The purpose of the SCP is to ensure the safety of U.S. Navy ships during docking and undocking...
August 25, 1987
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
A description is not available for this item.
December 27, 1985
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
A description is not available for this item.
August 31, 1984
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
A description is not available for this item.
September 7, 1976
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
A description is not available for this item.
April 15, 1974
SAFETY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DRYDOCKING FACILITIES AND SHIPBUILDING WAYS FOR U.S. NAVY SHIPS
A description is not available for this item.

References

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