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IEEE C95.3.1

Recommended Practice for Measurements and Computations of Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields with Respect to Human Exposure to Such Fields, 0 Hz to 100 kHz

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Organization: IEEE
Publication Date: 25 March 2010
Status: active
Page Count: 100
scope:

This recommended practice describes 1) methods for measuring external electric and magnetic fields and contact currents to which persons may be exposed, 2) instrument characteristics and the methods for calibrating such instruments, and 3) methods for computation and the measurement of the resulting fields and currents that are induced in bodies of humans exposed to these fields. This recommended practice is applicable over the frequency range of 0 Hz to100 kHz.

Purpose

The purpose of this recommended practice is to describe preferred measurement techniques and computational methods that can be used to ascertain compliance with contemporary standards for human exposure to electric and magnetic fields in the frequency range of 0 Hz to 100 kHz such as IEEE Std C95.1™-2005 [B55], IEEE Std C95.6™-2002 [B58], and similar standards.1 This document is intended primarily for use by engineers, biophysicists, and other specialists who are familiar with basic electromagnetic (EM) field theory and practice, and the potential hazards associated with exposure to EM fields. It will also be useful to bioeffects researchers, instrument developers and manufacturers, those developing calibration systems and standards, and individuals involved in critical hazard assessments or surveys.

1 The numbers in brackets correspond to those of the bibliography in Annex D.

Document History

IEEE C95.3.1
March 25, 2010
Recommended Practice for Measurements and Computations of Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields with Respect to Human Exposure to Such Fields, 0 Hz to 100 kHz
This recommended practice describes 1) methods for measuring external electric and magnetic fields and contact currents to which persons may be exposed, 2) instrument characteristics and the methods...

References

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