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AIR FORCE - AFI 44-153

DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSE & COMBAT AND OPERATIONAL STRESS CONTROL

active, Most Current
Organization: AIR FORCE
Publication Date: 29 May 2014
Status: active
Page Count: 19
scope:

Purpose.

Most individuals respond to challenging life events without significant negative consequences. Nonetheless, while in-garrison and in traditional battle roles, Airmen may encounter several types of incidents putting them at risk for the full spectrum of stress reactions ranging from minor stress reactions to more severe symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Disaster Mental Health (DMH) and Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) are two methods to proactively respond to these incidents and minimize the likelihood of longstanding or debilitating stress reactions.

Disaster Mental Health (DMH) is the coordinated response typically at permanent in garrison locations, initiated by unit leaders in which the DMH team provides psychological first aid to individuals and groups who may have or who have had direct exposure to an all-hazard incident. An all-hazard incident is any incident, natural or manmade, serious enough to warrant action to protect the life, property, health, and safety of military members, dependents, and civilians at risk, and minimize any disruptions of installation operations.

COSC utilizes many of the same psychological first aid principles as does DMH but addresses prevention and management of battle related stress before, during, and after deployment. The various presentations of combat related stress are termed Combat and Operational Stress Reactions (COSR) and when they occur are typically normal and/or an expected reaction to battle. In their milder and more common forms, COSRs do not represent diagnosable mental health conditions.

Document History

AFI 44-153
May 29, 2014
DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSE & COMBAT AND OPERATIONAL STRESS CONTROL
Purpose. Most individuals respond to challenging life events without significant negative consequences. Nonetheless, while in-garrison and in traditional battle roles, Airmen may encounter several...
May 29, 2014
DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSE & COMBAT AND OPERATIONAL STRESS CONTROL
A description is not available for this item.

References

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