UNLIMITED FREE ACCESS TO THE WORLD'S BEST IDEAS

close
Already an Engineering360 user? Log in.

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

Customize Your Engineering360 Experience

close
Privacy Policy

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

ISO/IEC DIS 5055

Information technology — Software measurement — Software quality measurement — Automated source code quality measures

active, Most Current
Buy Now
Organization: ISO
Publication Date: 4 June 2020
Status: active
Page Count: 267
ICS Code (Software): 35.080
scope:

Purpose

This specification updates, expands, and combines four previous adopted specifications of the OMG:

• Automated Source Code Maintainability Measure (ASCMM)

• Automated Source Code Performance Efficiency Measure (ASCPEM)

• Automated Source Code Reliability Measure (ASCRM)

• Automated Source Code Security Measure (ASCSM)

The measures in these standards were calculated from detecting and counting violations of good architectural and coding practices in the source code that could result in unacceptable operational risks or excessive costs. Establishing standards for these measures at the source code level is important because they have been used in outsourcing and system development contracts without having international standards to reference. For instance, the ISO/IEC 25000 series of standards that govern software product quality do not provide measures at the source code level.

A primary objective of updating these measures was to extend their applicability to embedded software, which is especially important for the growing implementation of embedded devices and the Internet of Things. Functionality that has traditionally been implemented in IT applications is now being moved to embedded chips. Since the weaknesses included in the measures specified in this document have been found to be applicable to all forms of software, embedded software is not treated separately in this specification.

Overview of Structural Quality Measurement in Software

Measurement of the structural quality characteristics of software has a long history in software engineering (Curtis, 1980). These characteristics are also referred to as the structural, internal, technical, or engineering characteristics of software source code. Software quality characteristics are increasingly incorporated into development and outsourcing contracts as the equivalent of service level agreements. That is, target thresholds based on structural quality measures are being written into contracts as acceptance criteria for delivered software. Currently there are no standards for most of the software structural quality measures used in contracts. ISO/IEC 25023 purports to address these measures, but only provides measures of external behavior and does not define measures that can be developed from source code during development. Consequently, providers are subject to different interpretations and calculations of common structural quality characteristics in each contract. This specification addresses one aspect of this problem by providing a specification for measuring four structural quality characteristics from the source code⎯Reliability, Security, Performance Efficiency, and Maintainability.

Recent advances in measuring the structural quality of software involve detecting violations of good architectural and coding practice from statically analyzing source code. Violations of good architectural and design practice can also be detected from statically analyzing design specifications written in a design language with a formal syntax and semantics. Good architectural and coding practices can be stated as rules for engineering software products. Violations of these rules will be called weaknesses in this specification to be consistent with terms used in the Common Weakness Enumeration (Martin & Barnum, 2006) which lists many of the weaknesses used in several of these measures.

The Automated Source Code Quality Measures are correlated measures rather than absolute measures. That is, since they do not measure all possible weaknesses in each of the four areas, they do not provide absolute measures. However, since they include counts of what industry experts have determined to be most severe weaknesses, they provide strong indicators of the quality of a software system in each area. In most instances they will be highly correlated with the probability of operational or cost problems related to each measure's area.

Recent research in analyzing structural quality weaknesses has identified common patterns of code structures that can be used to detect weaknesses. Many of these 'Detection Patterns' are shared across different weaknesses. Detection Patterns will be used in this specification to organize and simplify the presentation of weaknesses underlying the four structural quality measures. Each weakness will be described as a quality measure element to remain consistent with ISO/IEC 25020. Each quality measure element will be represented as one or more Detection Patterns. Many quality measure elements (weaknesses) will share one or more Detection Patterns in common.

The normative portion of this specification represents each quality attribute (weakness) and quality measure element (detection pattern) using the Structured Patterns Metamodel Standard (SPMS). The code-based elements in these patterns are represented using the Knowledge Discovery Metamodel (KDM). The calculation of each of the four Automated Source Code Quality Measures from their quality measure elements is then represented in the Structured Metrics Metamodel (SMM). This calculation is developed by counting the number of detection patterns for each weakness, and then summing these numbers for all the weaknesses included in the specific quality characteristic measure.

Document History

ISO/IEC DIS 5055
June 4, 2020
Information technology — Software measurement — Software quality measurement — Automated source code quality measures
Purpose This specification updates, expands, and combines four previous adopted specifications of the OMG: • Automated Source Code Maintainability Measure (ASCMM) • Automated Source Code...

References

Advertisement