UNLIMITED FREE ACCESS TO THE WORLD'S BEST IDEAS

close
Already an Engineering360 user? Log in.

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

Customize Your Engineering360 Experience

close
Privacy Policy

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

AASHTO T 388

Standard Method of Test for Detectable Warning Systems

active, Most Current
Buy Now
Organization: AASHTO
Publication Date: 1 January 2020
Status: active
Page Count: 56
scope:

This method of test covers the specimen fabrication, testing protocols, and laboratory-accelerated weathering of detectable warning systems for the purposes of evaluating durability. This method of test covers the following categories:

Non-Destructive Evaluation Tests:

• Visual and Microscopic Evaluation (Section 6)

• Dome Shape and Geometry Measurement (Section 7)

• Static Coefficient of Friction Measurement, Dry and Wet (Section 8)

• Color Measurement (Section 9)

Destructive Evaluation Tests:

• Resistance to Impact from Falling Tup (Section 10)

• Resistant to Impact from Simulated Snowplow Blade (Cold Exposure) (Section 11)

• Wear Resistance (Section 12)

• Coating and Single Dome Bond (Systems with Coatings or Surface-Applied Single Domes) (Section 13)

Laboratory-Accelerated Weathering-Exposure Regime (Hot and Cold Exposure Categories):

• High Temperature Thermal Cycling (Section 14)

• Abrasion Exposure (Section 15)

• Freeze-Thaw Durability (Cold Exposure Applications only) (Section 16)

• Ultraviolet Light Exposure (Section 17)

Figure 1 illustrates the suite of tests that are available to evaluate the durability of detectable warning systems.

Document History

AASHTO T 388
January 1, 2020
Standard Method of Test for Detectable Warning Systems
This method of test covers the specimen fabrication, testing protocols, and laboratory-accelerated weathering of detectable warning systems for the purposes of evaluating durability. This method of...

References

Advertisement