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API/IP RP 1540

DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF AVIATION FUELLING FACILITIES

inactive, Most Current
Organization: API
Publication Date: 1 February 2004
Status: inactive
Page Count: 94
scope:

This publication supersedes the third edition of the Institute of Petroleum's Model Code of Safe Practice Part 7 Airports Safety Code, published in 1998, and the second edition of the American Petroleum Institute's Publication 1500 Storage and Handling of Aviation Fuels at Airports, which was withdrawn in 1998.

This publication has been prepared jointly by the API Aviation Technical Services Subcommittee and EI Aviation Committee, with technical feedback from other industry stakeholders, and is intended to provide guidance on the siting, layout, design, construction, operation and maintenance of aircraft fuelling facilities, including the design and construction of fuellers, hydrant servicers and ancillary equipment used in fuelling aircraft.

The guidance contained in this edition has been significantly revised from earlier editions to ensure that the safe practices contained herein are equally applicable in all areas of the world; to include adequate guidance for the large number of non-airline type facilities used by retail and consumer-type operations; to include suitable reference to environmental protection controls and facilities that are receiving increased emphasis and regulation in some regions and to ensure that the guidance reflects current levels of knowledge and industry experience.

As it is difficult for a clear delineation to be made between commercial airport facilities and others such as are found in retail or consumer operations, those using this publication should decide which sections are applicable to their specific operation. However, some guidance is offered in Section 13.

The guidance contained in this publication is primarily intended to apply to civil aviation operations. However, many of the practices and procedures are suitable for military operations, except where they conflict with specific regulations and codes that are designed to fulfil military requirements.

The guidance relating to design of equipment is primarily intended for new facilities, and for existing facilities which are significantly upgraded. It is not therefore intended that the guidance be applied retrospectively where it is not practicable to do so.

Local, national, regional, international or industry standards may be applicable to certain aspects of aviation fuelling facilities and/or equipment, depending on location. A list of the most widely applied of these is provided in Annex B. References to this Annex are made throughout this publication, and such references, and all other similar references, refer to the latest edition of the document in question.

It is recommended that where a local or national standard either does not exist, or is less stringent than a standard with a similar scope listed at Annex B, the standard listed at Annex B should be used. Conversely, where a local or national standard is more stringent than a standard with a similar scope listed in Annex B, then the more stringent standard should be used.

In addition, in some areas local or national fuelling and other statutory regulations also apply. This publication is intended to be complementary to these established controls and practices.

This publication is intended to provide recommendations for safe practice, rather than set rigid requirements. Users of this publication should be aware that due consideration should be given to the effect of any unusual or abnormal circumstance, on which it is not possible to generalize within the scope of this publication.

For the purpose of this publication the definitions given in Annex A apply irrespective of any other meaning the words may have in other connections.

The API and the EI are not undertaking to meet the duties of employers to warn and equip their employees, and others exposed, concerning health and safety risks and precautions, nor undertaking their obligations under local and regional laws and regulations.

Nothing contained in any publication produced jointly by API and EI is to be construed as granting any right, by implication or otherwise, for the manufacture, sale, or use of any method, apparatus, or product covered by letters patent. Neither should anything contained in the publication be construed as insuring anyone against liability for infringement of letters patent.

It is hoped and anticipated that this publication will assist those involved in aviation fuel handling at airports. Every effort has been made by the American Petroleum Institute and the Energy Institute to assure the accuracy and reliability of the data contained in this publication; however, API and EI make no representation, warranty, or guarantee in connection with this publication and hereby expressly disclaim any liability or responsibility for loss or damage resulting from its use or for the violation of any local or regional laws or regulations with which this publication may conflict.

Suggested revisions are invited and should be submitted to the director of standards, American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005, or the Technical Department, The Energy Institute, 61 New Cavendish Street, London, W1G 7AR.

Document History

API/IP RP 1540
February 1, 2004
DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF AVIATION FUELLING FACILITIES
This publication supersedes the third edition of the Institute of Petroleum's Model Code of Safe Practice Part 7 Airports Safety Code, published in 1998, and the second edition of the American...

References

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