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ASCE 7 GUIDEBOOK

Guide To The Use Of The Wind Load Provisions Of ASCE 7-02

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Organization: ASCE
Publication Date: 1 January 2004
Status: inactive
Page Count: 141
scope:

Introduction

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) publication, SEVASCE Standard 7-02, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, is a consensus standard. It originated in 1972 when the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) published a standard with the same title (ANSI A58.1-1972). That 1972 standard was revised 10 years later, containing an innovative approach to wind loads for components and cladding (C&C) of buildings (ANSI A58.1-1982). Wind load criteria were based on the understanding of aerodynamics of wind pressures in building corners, eaves, and ridge areas, as well as the effects on pressures of area averaging.

In the mid-1980s, the ASCE assumed responsibility for the Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures Standards Committee, which establishes design loads. The document published by ASCE (ASCE '7- 88) contained design load criteria for live loads, snow loads, wind loads, earthquake loads, and other environmental loads, as well as load combinations. The ASCE 7 Standards Committee has voting membership of close to 100 individuals representing all aspects of the building construction industry. The criteria for each of the environmental loads are developed by respective task committees.

The wind load criteria of ASCE 7-88 (ASCE, 1990) were essentially the same as ANSI A58.1-1982. In 1995, ASCE published ASCE 7-95. This version contained major changes in wind load criteria: the basic wind speed averaging time was changed from fastest-mile to 3-second gust. This in turn necessitated significant changes in boundary-layer profile parameters, gust effect factor, and some pressure coefficients. A Guide to the Use ofthe Wind Load Pre visions of ASCE 7-95 (Mehta and Marshall, 1998) was published by ASCE to assist practicing professionals in the use of wind load criteria of ASCE 7-95.

In 2000, ASCE published a revision of ASCE 7-95 with updated wind load provisions. The document is termed ASCE 7-98 and has the same title (ASCE, 2000). The International Building Code (ICC 2000) adopted the wind load criteria of ASCE 7-98 by reference. This was a major milestone since it had the potential to establish a single wind load criterion for design of all buildings and structures for the entire United States. A Guide to the Use of the Wind Load Provisions of ASCE 7-98 (Mehta and Perry, 2000) was published soon after publication of ASCE 7-98.

In 2003, the new standard, ASCE '7-02, was published. This guide is designed to assist practicing professionals in the use of wind load criteria of ASCE 7-02.

Document History

ASCE 7 GUIDEBOOK
January 1, 2004
Guide To The Use Of The Wind Load Provisions Of ASCE 7-02
Introduction The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) publication, SEVASCE Standard 7-02, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, is a consensus standard. It originated in...
January 1, 2002
Guide To The Use Of The Wind Load Provisions Of ASCE 7-98
A description is not available for this item.
January 1, 1995
Guide To The Use Of The Wind Load Provisions Of Asce 7-95
A description is not available for this item.

References

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