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IEEE - 1621

Standard for User Interface Elements in Power Control of Electronic Devices Employed in Office/Consumer Environments

inactive
Organization: IEEE
Publication Date: 8 December 2004
Status: inactive
Page Count: 20
scope:

Foreword

The electronics industry has been proactive in including product features that reduce power levels when possible to save energy and extend battery life. Much of this has been accomplished through industry work with the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR® programa, and globally, billions of dollars worth of electricity are saved each year through the use of power management (Kawamoto, et al. [B2]b). Despite this success, many devices that are capable of power management are not saving energy because the power management features are disabled, incorrectly configured, or thwarted by hardware or software conflicts (PIER 500-03- 012f [B3]), (Roberson, et al. [B5]), (Webber, et al. [B6]). For PCs, the great majority are not powermanaging. For monitors, printers, and copiers, the rates are above 50%, but significant improvement is still possible. Thus, there is the potential for considerable additional savings through higher enabling rates in power management. In addition, there are a variety of reasons to expect that the opportunity for energy savings from power management will only increase in coming years, such as more devices and device types that can power manage, greater number of hours these devices are wanted to be available, and greater difference between on and sleep states.

The goal of this standard is to capture energy savings by increasing the rate at which power management features are enabled and operate successfully. This standard should lead to other benefits such as improved ease of use and reduced burden of customer support on manufacturers.

At present, power management controls in office equipment and other electronic devices show little consistency in the terms, symbols, and indicators used and in their overall structure. This is particularly true across device types (e.g., between a PC and a copier), but often holds even within the same type of device. For example, the standby mode on some copiers refers to the state when they are fully on and immediately ready to act, but the standby mode on some computers and monitors refers to a low-power mode in which they have reduced capability and take time to recover. "Standby power" also is used for a device's minimum power state, which is an off state for most devices. The combination of controls and indications of power status is the user interface.

The confusion and ambiguity of so many power controls preclude many people from being able to understand power controls and power status. The problematic interfaces further deter these people and others from attempting to change power management settings or successfully doing so.

This standard is intended to accomplish a broad similarity of experience of power controls of any electronic device that is used in a normal work or home environment. It is intended to do this through voluntary means. It is not intended to stifle innovation in user interfaces, nor preclude deviations from the standard where clearly warranted.

The first draft of this standard was based on research (Nordman, et al. [B4]) conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and funded by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program of the California Energy Commission.

Scope

This standard covers the user interface for the power status control of electronic devices that ordinary people commonly interact with in their work and home lives, including, but not limited to, office equipment and consumer electronics. Key elements are terms, symbols, and indicators.

This standard does not specify maximum power levels, address safety issues, or cover internal mechanisms or interfaces for industrial devices.

Document History

December 8, 2004
User Interface Elements in Power Control of Electronic Devices Employed in Office/Consumer Environments
This standard covers the user interface for the power status control of electronic devices that ordinary people commonly interact with in their work and home lives, including, but not limited to,...
1621
December 8, 2004
Standard for User Interface Elements in Power Control of Electronic Devices Employed in Office/Consumer Environments
Foreword The electronics industry has been proactive in including product features that reduce power levels when possible to save energy and extend battery life. Much of this has been accomplished...

References

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