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IEEE 181

Standard on Transitions, Pulses, and Related Waveforms

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Organization: IEEE
Publication Date: 20 March 2003
Status: inactive
Page Count: 63
scope:

Foreword

This standard supersedes IEEE Std 194-1951, Standards on Pulses: Definition of Terms-Part 1, 1951. It should be used in conjunction with IEEE Std 181-1977, IEEE Standard on Pulse Measurement and Analysis by Objective Techniques.

The previous editions of the IEEE standards on pulses were published in 1951-1955, a period when pulse measuring instruments (principally, the cathode ray oscilloscope) were completing their evolution from qualitative indicators to quantitative instruments. These previous standards reflected this evolutionary stage in nomenclature, definitions, and methods of measurement which relied heavily on visual observation and subjective evaluation. No review of the growth of pulse technology in the intervening years is needed here; by 1966, when the IEEE Subcommittee on Pulse Techniques was formed, the previous edition of this standard was obsolete.

The greatest challenge the subcommittee faced was the development of a standard which would satisfy the needs of a wide range of users, users whose measurement practices ranged from the casual and inexact to the most careful and exact. Since a standard which covers exact work can, by degradation or omission, also cover inexact work, the subcommittee developed a standard which satisfies the needs of the user and manufacturer of sophisticated pulse apparatus. Nonetheless, study of Figure 2 will show that, barring changes in nomenclature, nothing has changed and the previous practices of the casual user are preserved.

The subcommittee also made the following decisions relative to the content of this standard:

1) No frequency domain terms (for example, bandwidth) would be used or defined.

2) No terms which link the time and frequency domains (for example, pulse bandwidth) would be used or defined.

3) No acronyms or coined words would be used or defined.

4) No synonyms would be used or defined. (For example, pulse is defined and impulse is neither used nor defined.)

5) The introduction of new concepts would be minimized. The only new concepts that are introduced are found in the definitions of epochs, feature, and quadrant.

The presentation of definitions in this standard, and within its sections, starts with the most general terms and proceeds to the definition of terms which are more specific in terms of terms that have been defined previously. This arrangement, while sacrificing alphabetical listing, yields a logical presentation of significant tutorial value. Terms that are adjectives are defined separately from terms that are nouns with the expectation that, as the need arises, adjective and noun terms will be combined to provide the required term.

Since its formation in 1966, the IEEE Subcommittee on Pulse Techniques has been broadly based. Collectively, its members represented or provided liaison with seven IEEE societies or groups (Circuits and Systems, Computer, Electron Devices, Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Instrumentation and Measurement, Magnetics, and Nuclear and Plasma Sciences), six technical associations (American Society for Testing and Materials, Electronic Industries Association, Instrument Society of America, National Conference of Standards Laboratories, Precision Measurement Association, and Scientific Apparatus Makers Association), and three technical committees of the International Electrotechnical Commission (Electron Tubes and Valves, Electronic Measuring Equipment, and Magnetic Materials and Components). Nine members of the subcommittee were from six countries other than the U.S. (France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom). Subcommittee members who represented users of pulse apparatus outnumbered members who represented manufacturers.

Beginning in 1970 the liaison between the subcommittee and Technical Committee 66, Electronic Measuring Equipment, of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) became progressively closer and culminated in an informal mutual understanding that both groups would attempt to provide their parent organizations with pulse standards which were the same. This goal was achieved; IEC Publication 469-1, 1974, Pulse Techniques and Apparatus, Part 1: Pulse Terms and Definitions, is technically (and, otherwise, substantially) identical to this standard.

Foreword to IEEE Std 181-1977

This standard supersedes IEEE Std 181-1955, Methods of Measurement of Pulse Quantities. It should be used in conjunction with IEEE Std 194-1977, Pulse Terms and Definitions.

The previous editions of the IEEE standards on pulses were published in 1951-1955, a period when pulse measuring instruments (principally, the cathode ray oscilloscope) were completing their evolution from qualitative indicators to quantitative instruments. These previous standards reflected this evolutionary stage in nomenclature, definitions, and methods of measurement which relied heavily on visual observation and subjective evaluation, or where more exact results were desired, on planimeters techniques. No review of the growth of pulse technology in the intervening years is needed here; by 1966 when the IEEE Subcommittee on Pulse Techniques was formed, the previous edition of this standard was obsolete.

The greatest challenge the Subcommittee faced was the development of a standard which would satisfy the needs of a wide range of users whose measurement practices ranged from the casual and inexact to the most careful and exact. Since a standard which covers exact work can, by degradation or omission, also cover inexact work, the Subcommittee developed a standard which satisfies the needs of the user and manufacturer of sophisticated pulse apparatus. In doing this the Subcommittee found it necessary to define or describe in a rigorous manner a number of well-established terms and techniques. Nonetheless, careful study of this standard will show that the techniques and practices of the more casual user have been preserved.

The Subcommittee also made the following decisions relative to the content of this standard: (1) No frequency domain terms (e.g., bandwidth) would be used or defined. (2) No terms which link the time and frequency domains (e.g., pulse bandwidth) would be used or defined. (3) No acronyms or coined words would be used or defined.

The Subcommittee minimized the introduction of new concepts. At the first reading it may appear that there is a significant amount of new material; this is not the case. Section 2, Definitions, merely defines terms and techniques, some, perhaps, for the first time, more completely, or to a finer level of distinction. Section 3 [of Std 181-1977], Measurement of Pulse Characteristics, presents a model of the pulse measurement process. Sections 5 through 9 [of Std 181-1977] merely extend analysis of the single pulse waveform to encompass both simpler and more complex waveforms. Only in Section 4 [of Std 181-1977] is new material found as follows:

1) Section 4.2, Waveform Epoch Determination. This material is not really new, but a new emphasis is put on the choice of data. Sections 4.3.1, and 4.3.2 do present new techniques for the determination of base magnitude, top magnitude, and pulse amplitude.

2) The presentation of material in this standard, and within its sections, starts with the most general concepts and proceeds to the presentation of concepts which are more specific in terms of concepts which have been presented previously. This arrangement, while sacrificing alphabetical listing, yields a logical presentation of significant tutorial value.

Since its formation in 1966 the IEEE Subcommittee on Pulse Techniques has been broadly based. Collectively, its members represented or provided liaison with seven IEEE Societies or Groups (Circuits and Systems, Computer, Electron Devices, Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Instrumentation and Measurement, Magnetics, and Nuclear and Plasma Sciences), six technical associations (American Society for Testing and Materials, Electronic Industries Association, Instrument Society of America, National Conference of Standards Laboratories, Precision Measurement Association, and Scientific Apparatus Makers Association), and three Technical Committees of the International Electrotechnical Commission (Electron Tubes and Valves, Electronic Measuring Equipment, and Magnetic Materials and Components). Nine members of the Subcommittee were from six countries other than the U.S. (France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom).

Beginning in 1970 the liaison between the Subcommittee and Technical Committee 66, Electronic Measuring Equipment, of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), became progressively closer and culminated in an informal mutual understanding that both groups would attempt to provide their parent organizations with pulse standards which were the same. This goal was achieved; IEC Publication 469-2, 1974, Pulse Techniques and Apparatus, Part 2: Pulse Measurement and Analysis, General Considerations, is technically (and, otherwise, substantially) identical to this standard.

Scope

This standard provides definitions of terms pertaining to transitions, pulses, and related waveforms, and provides definitions and descriptions of techniques and procedures for measuring their parameters. The waveforms considered in this standard are those that make a number of transitions and that remain relatively constant in the time intervals between transitions.

Document History

May 16, 2011
Transitions, Pulses, and Related Waveforms
This standard defines terms pertaining to transitions, pulses, and related waveforms and defines procedures for estimating their parameters. Purpose The purpose of the standard is to unambiguously...
IEEE 181
March 20, 2003
Standard on Transitions, Pulses, and Related Waveforms
Foreword This standard supersedes IEEE Std 194-1951, Standards on Pulses: Definition of Terms—Part 1, 1951. It should be used in conjunction with IEEE Std 181-1977, IEEE Standard on Pulse Measurement...
July 22, 1977
STANDARD ON PULSE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS BY OBJECTIVE TECHNIQUES (WITHDRAWN)
A description is not available for this item.

References

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