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SAE J1739

(R) Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (Design FMEA), Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (Process FMEA), and Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Machinery (Machinery FMEA)

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Organization: SAE
Publication Date: 1 June 2000
Status: inactive
Page Count: 47
scope:

Overview This SAE Recommended Practice was jointly developed by DaimlerChrysler, Ford, and General Motors.

This document introduces the topic of potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and gives general guidance in the application of the technique.

All FMEA's focus on the design, whether it be of the product, the process or the machinery used to build the product. An Applications Section (see Section 5) has been added to provide information on applying the FMEA technique to plant machinery and equipment using the Machinery FMEA (MFMEA).

Recommended Practice Format For ease of use, this reference document presents the two basic types of FMEA (Design FMEA and Process FMEA) in their own separate sections. This document also contains an Applications Section (Section 5) which discusses in some detail how an FMEA is applied to Plant Machinery and Equipment (Machinery FMEA).

The Machinery FMEA (MFMEA) information has been provided due to the importance of Plant Machinery and Equipment functioning as intended in manufacturing and assembly plants. The use of the MFMEA, on Plant Machinery and Equipment, will assist with the identification of potential failure modes, so that design and processing alternatives can be considered, prior to finalizing the Plant Machinery and Equipment Designs.

It should be noted that this document is a recommended practice, and as such, each Team is free to use the guidelines listed herein in the manner which will be most effective for a given situation. Section 5.2.17.1 contains a table of "Suggested Detection Evaluation Criteria" for MFMEA which has rankings of 10, 7, 5, 3, and 1 (does not contain rankings of 9, 8, 6, 4, and 2). This Applications Section Detection Table illustrates that the Team can make modifications to the standard format of 10-1 rankings, if this will be most effective for the Team's situation and application.

What is an FMEA? An FMEA can be described as a systemized group of activities intended to: (a) recognize and evaluate the potential failure of a product/process and its effects, (b) identify actions which could eliminate or reduce the chance of the potential failure occurring, and (c) document the process. It is complimentary to the process of defining what a design or process must do to satisfy the customer.

FMEA Implementation Because of the general industry trend to continually improve products and processes whenever possible, the need for using the FMEA as a disciplined technique to identify and help minimize potential concern is as important as ever. Studies of vehicle campaigns have shown that fully implemented FMEA programs could have prevented many of the campaigns.

One of the most important factors for the successful implementation of an FMEA program is timeliness. It is meant to be a "before-the-event" action, not an "after-the-fact" exercise. To achieve the greatest value, the FMEA must be done before a product or process failure mode has been incorporated into a product or process. Up front time spent properly completing an FMEA, when product/process changes can be most easily and inexpensively implemented, will minimize late change crises. An FMEA can reduce or eliminate the chance of implementing a preventive/corrective change which would create an even larger concern. Communication and coordination should occur between all types of FMEAs (i. e., Design - DFMEA, Process - PFMEA, and Machinery - MFMEA). (See Figure 1).

Figure 2 depicts the sequence in which an FMEA should be performed. It is not simply a case of filling out the column, but rather understanding the process and how to eliminate risk and plan the appropriate controls to protect customer satisfaction.

There are three basic cases for which FMEA's are generated, each with a different scope or focus:

Case 1: New designs, new technology, or new process.

The scope of the FMEA is the complete design, technology, or process.

Case 2: Modifications to existing design or process (assumes there is a FMEA for the existing design or process).

The scope of the FMEA should focus on the modification to design or process, possible interactions due to the modification, and field history.

Case 3: Use of existing design or process in a new environment, location, or application (assumes there is an FMEA for the existing design or process). The scope of the FMEA is the impact of the new environment or location on the existing design or process.

Although responsibility for the preparation of the FMEA is usually assigned to an individual, FMEA input should be a team effort. A team of knowledgeable individuals should be assembled (e.g., engineers with expertise in Design, Analysis/Testing, Manufacturing, Assembly, Service, Recycling, Quality, and Reliability). The FMEA is initiated by the engineer from the responsible activity, which can be the Original Equipment Manufacturer (i.e., produces the final product) supplier, or a subcontractor.

It is not appropriate to compare the ratings of one team's FMEA with the ratings of another team's FMEA, even if the product/ process appear to be identical, since each team environment is unique and thus their respective individual ratings will be unique (i.e., the ratings are subjective).

Review of the FMEA document against FMEA quality objectives (see Appendix A and Appendix B) is recommended including a management review.

Follow-Up The need for taking specific, preventive/corrective actions with quantifiable benefits, recommending actions to other activities and following-up all recommendations cannot be overemphasized. A thoroughly thought out and well developed FMEA will be of limited value without positive and effective preventive/corrective actions.

The responsible engineer is in charge of assuring that all recommended actions have been implemented or adequately addressed. The FMEA is a living document and should always reflect the latest level, as well as the latest relevant actions, including those occurring after the start of production.

The responsible engineer has several means of assuring that recommended actions are implemented. They include, but are not limited to the following:

a. Assuring design/process/machine requirements are achieved

b. Review of engineering drawings, processes, and specifications

c. Confirmation of incorporation of changes to design/assembly/manufacturing documentation

d. Review of Design/Process FMEAs, special FMEA applications such as Machinery FMEA and Control Plans

Document History

January 1, 2021
(R) Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Including Design FMEA, Supplemental FMEA-MSR, and Process FMEA
This FMEA standard describes potential failure mode and effects analysis in design (DFMEA), supplemental FMEA-MSR, and potential failure mode and effects analysis in manufacturing and assembly...
January 1, 2009
(R) Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (Design FMEA), Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (Process FMEA)
This FMEA Standard describes Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (DFMEA) and Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (PFMEA). It assists...
August 1, 2002
(R) Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (Design FMEA), Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (Process FMEA), and Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Machinery (Machinery FMEA)
General Information Overview - This SAE Recommended Practice was jointly developed by DaimlerChrysler Corporation, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Corporation. This document introduces the...
SAE J1739
June 1, 2000
(R) Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (Design FMEA), Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (Process FMEA), and Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Machinery (Machinery FMEA)
Overview This SAE Recommended Practice was jointly developed by DaimlerChrysler, Ford, and General Motors. This document introduces the topic of potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and...
July 1, 1994
Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Design (Design FMEA) and Potential Failure Mode and Effects Analysis in Manufacturing and Assembly Processes (Process FMEA) Reference Manual, Recommended Practice
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