UNLIMITED FREE ACCESS TO THE WORLD'S BEST IDEAS

close
Already an Engineering360 user? Log in.

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

Customize Your Engineering360 Experience

close
Privacy Policy

This is embarrasing...

An error occurred while processing the form. Please try again in a few minutes.

UL - 2822 BULLETIN

UL Standard for Safety Measuring And Evaluating Chemical Emissions From Cleaners And Cleaning Maintenance Systems Using Dynamic Environmental Chambers, are being proposed:GREENGUARD Certification Program Method For Measuring And Evaluating Chemical Emissions From Cleaners And Cleaning Maintenance Systems Using Dynamic Environmental Chambers

active, Most Current
Organization: UL
Publication Date: 7 November 2014
Status: active
Page Count: 16
scope:

PREFACE

The science of measuring product emissions developed from research conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Consumer Product Safety Commissions, California Department of Health Services, the state of Washington Department of General Administration, and additional national and international researchers. UL Environment provides Greenguard Certification to 1) bring together performance based, field validated documents to define low emitting products and materials for the indoor environment; 2) provide a third party, non-industry and publicly available certification process for manufactured products; and 3) establish a public directory of certified products for architects, designers, specifiers, purchasers, and consumers.

The following test method incorporates the best-learned practices for testing and evaluating cleaning products and cleaning systems generally used for routine cleaning including general purpose cleaners, glass cleaners, toilet cleaners, floor cleaners, hard surface cleaners, institutional cleaning systems, aerosol products and carpet cleaners. Elements of the method include sample handling and shipment, sample preparation, product loadings and descriptions, environmental chamber exposure, analytical measurements, exposure modeling and allowable levels for the GREENGUARD Certification Program. Analytes include total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), individual VOCs, formaldehyde and other aldehydes, All individual VOCs emitting from products are measured as allowed by the Method, and each measured VOC is required to meet defined allowable levels.

The GREENGUARD Certification Gold incorporates additional criteria to provide a higher margin of safety for young children and sensitive populations. This document reduces allowable chemical levels. It also requires that emissions meet the 1/2 CREL criteria of certain target chemicals as listed in State of CA DHS's "Standard Practice for the Testing Of Volatile Organic Emissions Sources Using Small Scale Environmental Chambers" (CA/DHS/EHLB/R-174) and adopted by the California High Performance School (CHPS) Program. The GREENGUARD Certification Program for Chemical Emissions for Cleaners and Cleaning Maintenance Systems is the first that requires a review of measured chemical emissions across a broader range of risk based exposure levels, further strengthening the criteria by requiring product emissions be less than defined risk-based air concentration levels for both acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) exposures.

This test method, which incorporates the most current science of emissions testing, including global ISO requirements for environmental chamber and VOC testing, can be used for other emissions test programs requiring the measurement of chemical emissions and assessment of data. Various federal, state, municipal, and other publicly available programs or standards may apply this test method with appropriate acknowledgement. This test method is applicable to the measurement and evaluation of the inhalation criteria of Green Seal standard GS-37.

This method is maintained by UL Environment. The master document at UL Environment headquarters in Atlanta Georgia is the official document. This document is revised as new science, test protocols and allowable levels become available, and will be reviewed on an annual basis. Significant revisions will be reviewed through a consensus process of users and interested parties.

UL Environment documents are copyrighted by UL Environment and should not be altered by any third party in any way. No part of this method may be used independently of its intended purpose. All rights, ownership and copyrights of this document shall remain the sole and exclusive property of UL Environment.

UL Environment provides this document "as is" without warranty of any kind either expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for any purpose.

Cleaning products and systems may emit a variety of volatile chemicals into the indoor air space of a building. The following methodology measures total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), individual volatile organic compounds (IVOCs), formaldehyde and other aldehydes, levels from cleaning products, materials, and complete cleaning systems associated with routine cleaning using test conditions defined to simulate product use in realistic commercial office, educational, healthcare and/or residential settings. The level of total or individual volatile organic chemical emissions is determined by observing the TVOC, IVOC, or aldehyde, concentrations in a dynamic environmental chamber under specified test conditions. The observed chamber concentration is converted by a mathematical calculation to an emission rate, a product specific variable, and then modeled to obtain room concentration estimates. The quantity of VOCs in the environmental chamber air is determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The methodology is generally applicable to volatile organic compounds with boiling points from 60°C to 290°C emitting from individual products. Emissions of selected aldehydes are measured using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. Specialized analysis of chamber air samples may be conducted for other specific target chemicals as required for a specific product/project requirement.

Document History

2822 BULLETIN
November 7, 2014
UL Standard for Safety Measuring And Evaluating Chemical Emissions From Cleaners And Cleaning Maintenance Systems Using Dynamic Environmental Chambers, are being proposed:GREENGUARD Certification Program Method For Measuring And Evaluating Chemical Emissions From Cleaners And Cleaning Maintenance Systems Using Dynamic Environmental Chambers
PREFACE The science of measuring product emissions developed from research conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, the Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

References

Advertisement