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SNZ AS/NZS 5478

Recordkeeping metadata property reference set (RMPRS)

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Organization: SNZ
Publication Date: 30 June 2015
Status: active
Page Count: 108
scope:

This Standard is a 'reference set' of recordkeeping metadata properties. It is compatible with AS ISO 23081.1, AS/NZS ISO 23081.2 and AS/NZS ISO 23081.3. It provides additional details to these Standards by specifying recordkeeping metadata properties and their rules for use within the Australasian context.

This is a reference set in the following context:

(a) Individual jurisdictions are expected to maintain their own specifications that contain minor variations or recommended methods of implementation (e.g. one or multiple entity implementations) and define vocabulary encoding schemes that suit their own environment.

(b) Each jurisdiction should maintain mapping to this reference set to achieve the overall objectives of this Standard.

(c) Individual product developers that claim conformance are expected to maintain mappings to this reference set to achieve the overall objectives of this Standard.

(d) Individual implementation instances of recordkeeping should use this Standard as the mapping standard by which to achieve the overall objectives of this Standard.

PURPOSE

Digital records are dependent on metadata to enable the records to be interpreted in the context of their creation and management. The metadata is the set of many details which surround the information, such as-

(a) what the information is (a title and other descriptive metadata);

(b) who created the information;

(c) when the information was received or brought into a formal system;

(d) whether there are security restrictions on the use of the information within an organization or externally;

(e) whether the information is incomplete or still changing or is completed; and

(f) who needs to comment on, or authorize access to, or use of the record.

These details are routinely captured and managed in a variety of systems used to record transactions, provide services, draft documents, browse the web, and publish to the intranet or to persons outside an organization. To manage digital records successfully, and in a way that will allow future users (those not involved in the creation of the records) to understand and interpret the content, these bits of information need to be structured into formal 'metadata properties'; that is data fields that are clearly defined.

Some recordkeeping metadata properties are mandatory; without these, even basic operations cannot be carried out. Other metadata properties are optional-they are at the discretion of the system or user to assign. In general, the more metadata that is applied to records, the greater are the chances that some of this metadata will assist users to interpret and use the records.

In the paper world, much of this metadata was contained in the content of the record or file: in annotations showing changes or recommendations for approval, and in management details such as folio numbering expressing sequential relationships. In a digital world, all these long familiar features of paper systems, disappear. These features have been critical to the efficient conduct of business for paper systems and there is a need to ensure that the digital equivalent, metadata, is defined to support the digital systems. Metadata is not optional or just 'good to have'; in a digital world, it is crucial for ensuring that records will be interpreted accurately, and can be sustained over time.

In digital workplaces, the requirement for structured metadata for records is growing in importance. Records are being created in dynamic environments where the records creation process is collaborative and often occurs in systems that are shared between multiple independent parties. The rights and responsibilities relating to shared documents and records need to be identified and managed, in order to enable all parties with legitimate claims to retrieve and use that information over time.

Digital records often need to last longer than individual software systems in order to meet requirements established by regulators, business needs, accountability principles and community expectations. This means that records need to pass between one system to another over time, and often between one responsible organization and another. Records content without recordkeeping metadata is neither complete nor interpretable. Recordkeeping metadata is a part of the records, and as such needs to be carefully structured to enable easy interchange between multiple systems over time.

Document History

SNZ AS/NZS 5478
June 30, 2015
Recordkeeping metadata property reference set (RMPRS)
This Standard is a ‘reference set' of recordkeeping metadata properties. It is compatible with AS ISO 23081.1, AS/NZS ISO 23081.2 and AS/NZS ISO 23081.3. It provides additional details to these...

References

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