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IEEE 264

HIGH-POWER WIDE-BAND TRANSFORMERS

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Organization: IEEE
Publication Date: 5 August 1968
Status: inactive
Page Count: 23
scope:

This publication pertains to wide-band trans¬formers, transmitting power of more than 100 watts. Guides to application and test proce¬dures are included. Appendices contain certain precautions and recommended practices. Provi¬sion is made for including data for use in the design of feedback amplifiers and control net¬works or other circuits in which knowledge of the transformer amplitude- and phase-frequency response is needed by the system designer. These transformers are required to transform voltage within specified tolerances of amplitude and phase when operating between specified impedances.

Specific types to which this Standard ap¬plies are as follows: 

Power Audio-Frequency Transformers are operated from amplifier tube sources. The fundamental full power frequency range will normally fall within the band of 20-20,000 cycles per second. Performance characteris¬tics one or more octaves beyond the specified range may be of interest and specified. Feed¬back windings or screen-grid windings or taps may be incorporated in the design. The performance of these transformers is generally expected to be uniform over the specified range and not be the cause of undue distortion of the input wave shape. 

Transducer Service Transformers normally require a step-down ratio transformer having one or more secondary windings with or without taps. The load impedance may be permitted to vary with frequency, or with other parameters, but the transformer per-formance is generally based on a specific load impedance. 

Random-Noise Transformers are used in vibration machine applications. They are subject to random signals of varying am¬plitude and duration. Response may be ex¬pressed in terms of frequency spectrum but the amplitude variation allowable over the relevant frequency range is much greater than for audio transformers because of the Gaussian distribution of random noise. Random noise transformers are often included in feedback loops. When included in such a loop, their amplitude and phase response is of interest and all of the problems listed in Appendix VII must be solved in addition to producing a transformer capable of handling the ampli¬tude of random noise. 

Modulation Transformers are used in amplitude-modulated transmitters employ¬ing a modulation inductor (reactor) to bypass the final amplifier plate current. They are also used where the secondary carries the final amplifier plate current. The transformer is used in a manner which makes it a part of a capacitance, resistance, and inductance network and it must have characteristics which permit it to match the network for proper over-all system perform-ance. Phase angle, frequency response, and impedances are important measurements and are required to be made in the actual or sub-stitute network with major elements in place to establish performance. Modulation trans-formers are usually designed for specific ap-plications and large units are not considered suitable for general purpose use. 

Driver Transformers are used to sup-ply power to the grids of Class AB2 and Class B amplifier tubes. 

Line-Matching Transformers are used where power is received at one im¬pedance level and delivered at another. 

Load-Matching Autotransformers are used where power is received at one imped¬ance level and provides output taps at various impedances, or vice versa. 

Control-System Transformers are used in open- or closed-loop (feedback) con¬trol systems. The transformers used in the closed-loop system are subject to signals of a definite carrier frequency, modulated in ac¬cordance with error signals imposed by the control system requirements. The response of these transformers to control signals may be expressed either in terms of frequency and phase or in Laplace terms. In this Standard the phase and amplitude frequency response concepts are used. 

Ultrasonic Transformers are used in various communication and industrial applica-tions, in which the lowest frequency is higher than 10 kilocycles per second.

Carrier Transformers transmit signals of specified frequency; which signals are modulated or varied in amplitude, frequency, or phase. 

Video Transformers are character¬ized by an exceptionally wide-band transmis¬sion characteristic over part or all of the range from 10 cycles per second to 10 megacycles per second.

Power Transistor Source Audio Transformers are operated from solid-state power source devices. The use of Class AB or Class B current operation must be recognized. 

Inductors (Reactors) are used in wide-band circuits. The required degree of linearity and self-resonance must be specified. 

Related Transformer Standards 

Standard for the Low-lPower Wide¬Band Transformer (IEEE No. Ill, August 1964). 

Proposed Standard for Narrow-Band Transformers (under preparation). 

Corona Standard (under study). 

Standard on Electric Strength Test¬ing (under preparation). 

Transformer Impulse Tests-IEEE No. 93.

Document History

January 1, 1977
STANDARD FOR HIGH-POWER WIDE-BAND TRANSFORMERS (100 WATTS AND ABOVE)
A description is not available for this item.
IEEE 264
August 5, 1968
HIGH-POWER WIDE-BAND TRANSFORMERS
This publication pertains to wide-band trans¬formers, transmitting power of more than 100 watts. Guides to application and test proce¬dures are included. Appendices contain certain precautions and...
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