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ABS - 252

GUIDANCE NOTES ON DATA INTEGRITY FOR MARINE AND OFFSHORE OPERATIONS ABS CyberSafety VOLUME 3

active, Most Current
Organization: ABS
Publication Date: 1 September 2016
Status: active
Page Count: 41
scope:

Purpose and Scope

The maritime industry is beginning to use data as an asset. Historically, marine and offshore owners' and operators' major concerns were safety, asset integrity, and environmental protection. Increased presence and use of cyber-enabled data systems introduces data as both an enabler to address safety risks and as another area for concern. Vessels and their sensors generate large amounts of data from multiple sources.

Note: The general term "vessel" used throughout these Guidance Notes denotes a ship, a barge, an offshore unit or facility, or any other floating or fixed structure.

Section 1, Figure 1 illustrates nominal data sources and flows in marine and offshore operations. Three typical data sources and paths include:

Data Generated and Communicated Locally. With the development of modern electronics and control technologies, extensive data can be generated and captured. The data covers a wide range of on-onboard systems and instruments, both from permanently-installed equipment and from cargo or portable equipment.

Data Communicated between Vessels. The data communicated between vessels could be vessel status such as position, speed, direction, etc., but it may also include performance data, cargo carriage data, rig operational status data, or other raw or composite data sources.

Data Communicated between Shore and Vessel. Operational, performance, and commercial data may come from shore-based systems as well as onboard systems. Data transferred from vessel to shore for data processing such as fleet management and benchmarking and maintenance management.

Data may be used for many functions beyond the traditional domains - for health and performance monitoring, operation, accomplishment prediction, business decision support, and others. New technical sources of data imply greater concern for data integrity and data security. Trustworthiness of data is vital to decision processes and to decision support.

These Guidance Notes are intended to clarify the concept and principles of Data Integrity for Marine and Offshore operations. The document will address data integrity as it relates to asset safety including human safety, safety of the vessel and/or threat to the environment. The objective of these Guidance Notes is to help the review engineers, surveyors, suppliers, shipyards, owners and operators to understand the application of Data Integrity in marine and offshore operations. The practices described in these Guidance Notes will improve the integrity of data.

 

Document History

252
September 1, 2016
GUIDANCE NOTES ON DATA INTEGRITY FOR MARINE AND OFFSHORE OPERATIONS ABS CyberSafety VOLUME 3
Purpose and Scope The maritime industry is beginning to use data as an asset. Historically, marine and offshore owners’ and operators’ major concerns were safety, asset integrity, and environmental...

References

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