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ARMY - AR 10-87

Army Commands, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units

active, Most Current
Organization: ARMY
Publication Date: 11 December 2017
Status: active
Page Count: 61
scope:

Purpose

This regulation prescribes Army Commands (ACOMs), Army service component commands (ASCCs), and direct reporting units (DRUs) missions, functions, and command and staff relationships within the Department of the Army (DA).

a. Institutional Force. The institutional force ensures the readiness of all Army forces and consists of Army organizations whose primary mission is to generate, prepare, and sustain the operating forces of the Army. Therefore, the institutional force remains under the direction and control of DA.

b. Geographic combatant command. The Army's designation for an ASCC assigned to a geographic combatant command (CCMD) is the theater Army. This regulation will not infringe on the combatant command authority vested, by law, in combatant commanders (CCDRs) or alter the command relationships and authorities specified by the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF). ASCCs will address changes in force assignment with their supported CCMD in accordance with procedures specified by the SECDEF. This regulation applies to the following Army organizations:

c. Army commands.

(1) U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM).

(2) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).

(3) U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC).

d. Army service component commands.

(1) Theater Armies-

(a) U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR)/Seventh Army.

(b) U.S. Army Central (USARCENT)/Third Army.

(c) U.S. Army Africa (USARAF)/Ninth Army.

(d) U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC).

(e) U.S. Army North (USARNORTH)/Fifth Army.

(f) U.S. Army South (USARSOUTH)/Sixth Army.

(2) Functional Commands-

(a) U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC).

(b) Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (MSDDC).

(c) U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Strategic Command (USASMDC/ARSTRAT).

(d) U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER).

e. Direct reporting units.

(1) U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM).

(2) U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM).

(3) U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC).

(4) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

(5) U.S. Army Military District of Washington (MDW).

(6) U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC).

(7) United States Military Academy (USMA).

(8) U.S. Army War College (USAWC).

(9) U.S. Army Acquisition Support Center (USAASC).

(10) U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM).

(11) U.S. Army Financial Management Command (USAFMCOM).

(12) U.S. Army Human Resources Command (HRC).

(13) U.S. Army Civilian Human Resources Agency (USACHRA).

(14) U.S. Army Marketing and Engagement Brigade (USAMEB).

(15) Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) and U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery ( (USSAHNC).

f. General.

(1) Army General Orders provide organization missions and command authorities. AR 10-87 supplements the Army General Orders and describes organization functions and command and staff relationships.

(2) The ASCCs exercise mission command under the authority and direction of the CCDRs to whom they are assigned and in accordance with the policies and procedures established by the SECDEF. In the event of a discrepancy between this regulation and the policies or procedures established by the SECDEF, the SECDEF policies or procedures take precedence.

(3) Per Section I of the Global Force Management Implementation Guidance, the Secretaries of the military departments may operate as "Force Providers" of Service retained forces, with discrete authorities specifically delegated by the SECDEF. Where appropriate, this regulation codifies how the Secretary of the Army (SECARMY) delegates these discrete authorities to the commanders of military service forces.

(4) Administrative control (ADCON).

(a) ADCON is not a command relationship. ADCON is direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations in respect to administration and support.

(b) ADCON is synonymous with administration and support responsibilities identified in Title 10, United States Code (10 USC). This is the authority necessary to fulfill military departments' statutory responsibilities for administration and support.

(c) The SECARMY's 10 USC responsibilities are exercised through ADCON. ADCON includes organization of Service forces, control of resources and equipment, personnel management, unit logistics, individual and unit training, readiness, mobilization, demobilization, discipline, and other matters not included in the operational missions.

(d) ADCON may be delegated to and exercised by commanders of Service forces assigned to a CCDR at any echelon at or below the level of Service component command. ADCON is subject to the command authority of CCDRs. ADCON may be delegated to and exercised by commanders of Service commands assigned within Service authorities. Service commanders exercising ADCON will not usurp the authorities assigned by a CCDR having combatant command authority over commanders of assigned Service forces.

(e) Normally, ASCCs exercise ADCON responsibilities for Army forces assigned to the CCDR within their area of responsibility (AOR). In some cases, an ACOM or DRU may share ADCON responsibilities with the ASCC for assigned organizations deployed to an AOR in order to more efficiently and effectively support globally deployed Army forces.

(f) CCDRs exercise combatant command authority over operational Army forces assigned to the CCDR. The CCDR normally delegates operational control (OPCON) of Army forces to the ASCC.

(g) Subject to applicable law, regulation, and policy, the allocation of authorities and responsibilities pertinent to the exercise of shared ADCON should be documented in appropriate agreements/understandings between the commanders of the ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs with whom ADCON responsibilities are shared.

(5) ARCYBER exercises directive authority for cyberspace operation authority (as delegated by SECDEF and U.S. Cyberspace Command (USCYBERCOM)). ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, and all other Army organizations will comply with cyberspace operations (CO)-related orders and directives issued by ARCYBER (or designated delegates). A mutual support relationship exists between ARCYBER and ACOMs, ASCC, DRUs, and all other Army organizations to secure, operate, and defend the Department of Defense Information Network (DODIN), maintain freedom of action, and deny the same to our adversaries.

(6) The DRUs will exercise authorities as specified in regulation, policy, delegation, or other issuance.

(7) The U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC) performs 10 USC support to units with Army Reserve unit identification codes (UICs). Units with Regular Army UICs receive 10 USC support from their respective Army organization. Units with Army National Guard (ARNG) UICs receive premobilization support from Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) through the National Guard Bureau (NGB) under Title 32 USC.

Document History

AR 10-87
December 11, 2017
Army Commands, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units
Purpose This regulation prescribes Army Commands (ACOMs), Army service component commands (ASCCs), and direct reporting units (DRUs) missions, functions, and command and staff relationships within...
September 4, 2007
ARMY COMMANDS, ARMY SERVICE COMPONENT COMMANDS, AND DIRECT REPORTING UNITS
Applicability. This regulation applies to the Active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve unless otherwise stated. Purpose This...
October 30, 1992
MAJOR ARMY COMMANDS IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES
A description is not available for this item.

References

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