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AWS - C5.7:00R2006

Recommended practices for electrogas welding

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Organization: AWS
Publication Date: 1 January 2006
Status: inactive
Page Count: 74
ICS Code (Welding processes): 25.160.10
ISBN (print): 0-87171-575-9
scope:

1.1 Scope. This document provides recommended practices for electrogas welding low carbon pressure vessel, and structural steels. Aluminum and stainless steel are excluded because of a lack of general commercial use of electrogas welding for these materials. This standard makes use of the U.S. Customary Units. Approximate mathematical equivalents in the International System of Units (SI) are provided for comparison in parentheses ( ) or in appropriate columns in tables and figures. Safety and health issues and concerns are beyond the scope of this standard and, therefore, are not fully addressed herein. Some safety and health information can be found in Section 14. Safety and health information is available from other sources, including, but not limited to, ANSI Z49.1, Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, and applicable federal and state regulations. 1.2 Introduction. Electroslag welding (ESW) was the first single-pass vertical welding process made commercially available. Immediately after its successful implementation, there was a demand for equipment that wouldenable similar techniques to be applied to workpieces with thinner sections than is generally possible with ESW. Until ESW became available in 1961,1 almost all vertical joints were welded with the manual shielded metal arc or semiautomatic gas metal arc welding process. Laboratory evaluation using a flux cored electrode with auxiliary gas shielding and an adaptation of an electroslag machine determined that a plate as thin as 1/2 in. (13 mm) could be welded in the vertical position at high speeds by the single-pass electrogas technique. Electrogas welding (EGW) has enjoyed steady growth in the United States in recent years. This growth has occurred, not only because the process has inherent out-of-position capability, but also due to its high deposition rate, high efficiency, weld metal soundness, simple joint preparation, and other advantages. Some of the advantages associated with EGW result in considerable cost savings, particularly in joining thicker materials. Savings have been achieved when joint members can be joined in the vertical position and where thick base metal can be joined with a continuous vertical weld. EGW is often less expensive than the more conventional joining methods such as submerged arc welding (SAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) in thicker base metals or flat position welding by submerged arc welding (SAW) with the prohibitive associated material handling. Even in some applications involving thinner base metals, EGW has resulted in cost savings because of its efficiency, simple joint preparation, etc. There are two primary variations of the EGW process commonly used in the United States. In the first method, a solid electrode is fed into the joint. When using a solid electrode, external shielding gas is required. In the second method, a flux cored or metal cored electrode is used. When using flux cored electrodes, both the externally gas shielded types, and self-shielded types are available. These methods of EGW for plain carbon, structural, and pressure vessel quality steels will be discussed in more detail later in these recommended practices. Although EGW has been used to join aluminum and some grades of stainless steels, those applications are not discussed in this document.

abstract:

Electrogas Welding (EGW) is a specialized welding process having similarities to the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) or the flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes for vertical position welding. The... View More

Document History

C5.7:00R2006
January 1, 2006
Recommended practices for electrogas welding
1.1 Scope. This document provides recommended practices for electrogas welding low carbon pressure vessel, and structural steels. Aluminum and stainless steel are excluded because of a lack of...

References

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